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July 2012, Page 2

What Is It and How Do You Eat It Summer 2012

Calamansi

Calamansi

Calamansi—Citrofortunella microcarpa: Native to the Philippine Islands, though believed to have originated from China, it is sometimes called golden lime. It looks like a miniature orange, but is actually sour like a lime. It can be used in place of lime or vinegar, in drinks or in dressings.

Calamansi comes and goes a few times a year; lower elevation trees here can produce almost year around.

See page 47 for a fantastic Chimichurri Calamansi Sauce recipe.

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recipe wave

recipe wave

Head Chef Miguel Magna of Tahiti Nui Bar and Restaurant in Hanalei, Kaua‘i, has created this recipe to help encourage us to try unusual and exotic fruits. For more information on Calamansi limes, see our last page “What Is It and How Do You Eat It”

I met Chef Miguel at a demonstration one Saturday morning at Harvest Market in Hanalei. These demonstrations are being scheduled on each island by Ken Love, president of Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Growers (HTFG), and funded by the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture through a USDA competitive grant program to foster small-farm sustainability. Ken was able to procure this grant, and the goal of this project is to introduce unusual tropical fruits that already grow in Hawai‘i to that part of the population not familiar with them. Fruit such as bilimbi, jackfruit, Surinam cherry, abiu, jaboticaba and many others are grown in enough quantity that they could be sold at groceries and beyond the usual farmers’ markets and to aware chefs. 

At each taste-test demo, a guest chef, project manager and local Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Grower members will be on hand to share their knowledge in using unusual fruit.… Read More

Hawaiian Shave Ice a History

shave ice

There is no ‘D’ in ‘shave ice,’
and it’s not a snow cone
BY G. NATALE

Shave ice traces its history to Japan, where it is known as kakigōri and dates back to the Heian Period (794–1185 AD). Shave ice was brought by Japanese immigrants who came to the Hawaiian islands to work on the sugar plantations in the late 1800s. They brought their traditional dessert with them, creating shave ice from large blocks of ice and using Japanese swords or machetes.

Hawaiian shave ice is an ice-based dessert made by shaving a block of ice. While the product can resemble a snow cone, snow cones are made with crushed, rather than shaved, ice. 

Shaving the block of ice produces a very fine ice that is fluffy and appears snow-like. This extremely fine texture causes added syrups to be absorbed by the ice rather than simply surrounding it. A properly made Hawaiian shave ice rarely requires a straw, since the flavors are in the ice and not at the bottom of the cup.… Read More

NOTABLE EDIBLES Summer 2012

Maui

Takasa Guri Guri is a food institution on Maui. For generations this local sweet spot has been much more than a cool treat. The guri guri is part sorbet, part ice cream, and has been locally made with a secret recipe by the same family for over 100 years. Just two flavors—strawberry and pineapple—and you order by the amount of scoops. No website or Facebook page. Located at the Maui Mall, 70 E. Ka‘ahumanu Ave. #C13, Kahului, Maui, HI 96732; 808-871-4513. Make sure you take a container home for later too!

O‘ahu

Bubbies Homemade Ice Cream & Desserts is the blend of two food cultures, Japanese and American. Best described as soft, smooth, chewy round-shaped mochi covering decadent homemade ice cream. For some eaters it’s the perfect one bite; others savor it in two or three bites. Some eat it frozen; others like myself sit and wait for a few minutes until the ice cream is soft and almost melted.  The combination of the chewy mochi and rich ice cream is heaven.  The flavors are traditional to tropical and even green tea and adzuki bean.… Read More

Letter of Aloha Summer 2012

I love summer in Hawai‘i—the color of the sky, the water and the mountains all become more clear and intense, yet there is something very peaceful about this intensity.  We have seasons in the Hawaiian Islands; most people who have never visited are not aware of this and are often surprised.  We have different fruits, vegetables and flowers in summer than we do in winter, and though our growing seasons may be longer than most places in North America, we also do have spring and fall, where the changes all begin. Right now the sweet smell of plumeria and gardenia is everywhere—it smells like summer in Hawai‘i.

I also love summer because it’s our birthday. Celebrate with us as we enter our sixth year of telling the stories of amazing people and places we have met along the way. I am always happy to hear how much people savor their copies of edible Hawaiian Islands, and keep them as a collection for reference.… Read More

Summer 2012

 

summer_2012_cvrDEPARTMENTS
4 LETTER OF ALOHA
7 NOTABLE EDIBLES
32 COOKING FRESH
WITH HUKILAU LANAI
49 EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
LOCAL DINING GUIDE
52 FARMERS MARKETS
56 ADVERTISER DIRECTORY
28 WHAT IS IT AND
HOW DO YOU EAT IT
FEATURES
8 HULA AND FOOD by Jon Letman
13 HELPING HORSES by Jade Eckardt
17 THERE’S A CATCH by Wanda Adams
22 USING THEIR NOODLE by Tim Ryan
38 IN A PICKLE by Ken Love
41 LITTLE HERB THAT COULD by Sophie Schweitzer
44 SHAVE ICE, IT’S NOT A SNOW CONE by G. Natale
47 RECIPE WAVE by Editor At Large
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