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July 2013

What Is It and How Do You Eat It Summer 2013

blimbi

BILIMBI

Bilimbi, Averrhoa bilimbi: are found in backyards throughout Asia, Hawai`i and other tropical climates. The tree is closely related to carambola, the star fruit, and also known as the cucumber tree for its long, thin shape. The fruit, sometimes called pias, are eaten pickled, raw or dipped in rock salt. Bilimbi can be added as a souring agent for the Filipino dish sinigang. The uncooked pias can be prepared as relish. In Asia, where the tree originated, its fruit is sometimes added to curry. Pias juice (with a pH of about 4.47) is made into a cooling beverage. Sometimes, it can be substituted for tamarind or tomato. The bright red flowers are also sometimes preserved in sugar.

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Lemon-Orange Olive Oil Cake

This is a wonderful rich, moist cake chock-full of citrus zest.

1 small orange, and
1 small lemon, both sliced and boiled until soft in sugar syrup
(2 cups sugar and 2 cups water; save syrup for other use)
6 ounces almonds, toasted and ground
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
4 eggs
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
⅔ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Powdered sugar
Ice cream

Boil the fruit until soft.

Cool and chop peel by hand-removing any bitter pith and
pulp.

Grind almonds and set aside with flour and baking powder.

Beat eggs with salt and then add sugar slowly until thick and
light.

Fold in flour mixture, then fruit, then oil.

Bake in 2- by 9-inch pans or 13 individual pans at 350°F.

Dust with powdered sugar and serve with a favorite ice cream.

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Lemon-Almond-Ricotta Cake

2½ cups almonds, coarsely chopped
½ cup flour
3 tablespoons lemon zest
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
½ pound butter, softened
6 eggs, separated
1¼ cups ricotta cheese
⅓ cup lemon juice

Combine almonds, flour and zest.

Beat the sugar and butter in the mixer until pale and fluffy. Add, the yolks one at a time and then the almond mixture.

Lightly mix the ricotta and the lemon juice

Beat the egg whites to soft peaks. Fold in the almond mixture and stir in the ricotta.

Pour into a buttered and wax-paper-lined 10-inch springform pan.

Bake 40 minutes at 300°F.

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Preserving a Fishpond —and a Food source, and History

house

Bordered by a busy boat harbor, sheltered exclusive hilltop residences and exposed to vast Kaneohe Bay, He‘eia Fishpond is all but hidden in this niche of windward

O‘ahu—known as He‘eia Uli, Ko‘olaupoko. This seclusion may well have both protected the 88-acre cultural treasure from overfishing and contributed to its deterioration, because no one noticed its relentless punishment by wind, waves, neglect and invasive mangrove.

“Even I wasn’t aware of this pond and my ‘ohana is from this community in Kahalu‘u,” said Hi‘ilei Kawelo, executive director of Paepae o He‘eia since 2007. The organization works in partnership with the landowner, Kamehameha Schools, to manage and maintain He‘eia Fishpond for the community. “I was blown away when I was introduced to this place.”

But not completely in a good way.

As important to Kawelo and the group of young Hawaiian friends was “the lack of Hawaiian presence” at such a significant cultural structure.… Read More

the Fishermen of Mama’s Fish House

reel deal

These Guys Are the ‘Reel Deal’
BY HEIDI POOL

“Good morning, fishroom.” Mike Pascher, head fish cutter for Mama’s Fish House, fields phone calls from fishermen while deftly butchering a glistening, burgundy-fleshed bigeye tuna.  “They call me right from their boats,” Mike tells me. “Sometimes I can hear the reel ratchets whirring in the background.”

Mama’s Fish House in Ku‘au serves 1,000 customers daily, requiring Mike to purchase some 500 pounds of fish every day—most of it from Maui fishermen. “We wrote checks to 200 fishermen last year. Some came once; some came every week,” he says.  Executive Chef Perry Bateman stops by the fishroom to see how the day’s procurements are going. He tells me there are two types of fishermen: “heavies” and “lights.” “For ‘heavies,’ that’s their entire livelihood,” he says. “They fish every day to provide for their ‘ohana [family]. ‘Lights’ are weekend fishermen—they crack a beer and relax.… Read More

Letter of Aloha Summer 2013

Every seven years a cycle of change takes place. If patient, we wait and see waves in sets of seven. Farmers know that every seven years they should let the land rest. As we begin our seventh year of publishing Edible Hawaiian Islands magazine, we sense a cycle of change as well. Our summer issue is dedicated to Gloria Cohen, our publisher and editor in chief; and Steven Cohen, editor at large.

We say aloha as they embark on a new journey and honor Gloria and Steven, because over the past seven years they have shared the stories of the people across the islands and beyond our shores who make a difference in our local food scene—from chefs to home cooks and the farmers, ranchers and fishermen who dedicate their lives to provide food for our table.  Mahalo nui loa (thank you very much) to the Cohens, who have generously dedicated their passions so we can learn more and be inspired.… Read More

Summer 2013

ehi summer12 cvr
DEPARTMENTS
4 LETTER OF ALOHA
47 LOCAL DINING GUIDE
51 FARMERS MARKETS
56 ADVERTISER DIRECTORY
58

What Is It?

FEATURES
9

NOTABLE EDIBLES

10

HE`EIA FISHPOND by Tim Ryan

17 MAMA’S FISHERMEN – THE REEL DEAL
by Heidi Pool
20 KAMPACHI IN KONA
by Margaret Kearns
24

TO CATCH AN UHU
by Kainoa Horcajo

31

SEEDS OF HOPE
by Jon Letman

36

BOOK REVIEW
by G. Natale

38 COOKING FRESH
by chef Allan Nagun
37 RECIPE WAVE
by Jim Moffat
42 NOT SO SOUR by
Ken Love
 

Cover photo
Viet Doan/Dreamstime.com
Limu: Wawae`iole

 

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